Net Zero Guide For SMEs Produced By Environmental Industries Commission

Glass globe in forest Net Zero - A guide for SMEs working in the built environment is now available to Environmental Industries Commission (EIC) members.

Aimed at small and medium sized members, the guide highlights the steps that should be taken towards a carbon free future, explores how Net Zero is already influencing client decision making, and outlines how to meet new client expectations while seizing the business opportunities created.

The guide also provides a handy reference to previously released publications, reports, pledge schemes and sector plans, directly sign-posting to the most important and relevant sources of information.

Commenting on its launch, Dr Sarah Prichard, UK managing director at Buro Happold, and chair of the Net Zero group, said: “We designed this guide to help SMEs with practical and tangible advice to support them to make the right choices on their Net Zero journey.

“While much has been written around national targets and global conferences, the truth is that we will only succeed if we bring small and medium sized business on board. The UK economy is made up of six million SMEs making up 99.9% of the business population. Our guide is the first step towards this in our industries and I’m looking forward to further engaging both membership bases on this fundamental issue in the weeks and months ahead.”



The guide is released during Net Zero Week, a new national awareness campaign which is bringing together nearly 30 business associations and major organisations to explore all things Net Zero. EIC is a founding partner of the week.

Matthew Farrow, director of policy at EIC, added: “We are delighted to share this guide during the inaugural Net Zero Week.

“New ways of working will, of course, mean challenges and change over the near term, but it will also create new business opportunities. Our guide aims to help small and medium sized businesses in our sectors be as well-prepared as possible to seize these.”

High-rise buildings viewed between trees